Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Bolivian opposition ... RIP

4 April marked one year since the last election held in Bolivia. After almost five years (18 December 2005 - April 4, 2010) with at least one electoral event every 10 months, a whole year without campaigns, conflicts, and polls is evident, very evident.

In my tenth kilometer wondered: has the opposition learned something of electoral competition in the last year without making a fool of in the polls? To obtain a reply, I sought what was said about it online and found the surprise that opposition not only has learned nothing, but every day is more and more stupid.

Living proof HoyBolivia.com appeared in a "mamarracho" of analysis titled "Lecciones de abril". Which would be the lessons according to the "brilliant analysis "? That government lost votes, that that the public has punished him, blah blah blah ... In other words, the same bunch of mindless crap that appeared after the April 4, 2010. Not a single neuron added to the awkwardness and deployed last year ...

The bottom line? Easy. The Bolivian opposition has been reduced to a minimum, to its current level of insignificance not only because doesn't have a project to offer to Bolivia, not only because the lack of leadership capable of articulating forces, not only because the total lack of organic base for minimum territorial work to create and align forces behind a project ... It's in the current plight because instead of analysis capabilities it overflows of political opinología crude and without any understanding of what is a force, how it behaves and how it manifests its power in the election results ...

Bolivian opposition ... RIP

3 comments:

Pablo Andrés Rivero said...

You clearly are very far away from Bolivia's reality (also confirms by the place you're writing from, chile). Workers Central Union (COB) has been in the streets, a number of sector such as Health workers, miners, Retirees, rural and urban teachers alike were protesting.
If you think opposition is just a bunch of right-wing congress-men/women clearly you'll find surprises in the future.
It's very disappointing this blog's quality is going worse and worse.

Ego Ipse said...

Well... I didn't see your commentary before. So, sorry for the delay.

First of all, let me point an epistemological issue: the "nearness" to an observed object is the main "epistemological obstacle" (long life to Bachelard!!) to analyse it correctly. That's why, among other things, the bigest Latin American Studies Center are far away from Latin America. The most important of all is in University of Berlin. So, being "far away" from Bolivia (which is not the same to be "far away from Bolivia's reality"; there's another epistemological confussion there) counts as an advantage for me, not as disadvantage.

There's a second big issue in your commentary: you heavily missed the point of the text. Exactly what does the street procesions have to do with "electoral competition"? The text clearly points is focus: "...has the opposition learned something of electoral competition in the last year without making a fool of in the polls?" The reflexion here presented tries to answer this question. "Electoral competition": this is the focus, not the "social opposition" (supposing your commentary is based or at least is aware of social/political analytical distinction). "The opposition" is mainly a political phenomenum. The street riots are social phenomena. And even supposing that street riots qualify as "opposition" (which, by defintion, is "political"), then the state of this opposition is worst than political one: it rests in mass spontaneity, lacks of organizarion and leadership, is merely reactiv, and doesn't have a project...

You see what happens when you get to close to what you observe...

It's very disappointing the commentaries' quality in this blog is going worse and worse...

Iesha said...

This is awesome!